Advanced Web Copywriting Secret #1 – The Riveting Review

What do you do when what you’re trying to sell from your website isn’t selling? You’ve written what you think is great sales copy, you’re all excited…but when you post it online and start getting visitors…NOTHING. They ain’t buyin’ it!

This article will shed some light on a high-powered web content secret that will have you selling like crazy…just like the most successful online marketers.

So how do you go from no sales to plenty of sales with just a bunch of words?

ANSWER: Write a Review…

If you’ve been in e-commerce for any length of time, you probably know that when most people want to buy something, they will go to a search engine and type in “NAME OF PRODUCT + review” to find out if the product is worth buying or not.

And it makes sense, doesn’t it? An online sales letter or product description is just a self-serving pitch. But a third person review has a lot more credibility and honesty.

That’s been my experience: I’ve bought a ton of stuff online after reading a decent review. I’d head to the seller’s sales or landing page and think, “Ugh. This is awful!” And yet, despite of a crappy sales page, I would buy the product just based on the third-party review.

However, there is a right way and a wrong way to create a selling review. Get it right, and you’ll make a mint. Get it wrong, and you’ll be laughed off the Internet (and not make a penny).

Although there are so many different ways to put together a review, I’ve found the following structure to be incredibly persuasive.

The Structure of a Selling Review:

1. What was the problem that caused you to search?

Give a brief story of what caused you (or someone else) to look for a solution. What pain were you in?

2. How did you come across the product?

This could be through a search engine, a blog post, a recommendation on a forum, even thumbing through a magazine at the dentist’s office.

3. What are the problems that are typical for this TYPE of product?

Why haven’t other solutions turn out not to be solutions? What do people usually complain about in this category of products?

4. Now introduce the product. What is its name? What are the main promises of the product? What are some of its features and benefits? How would you describe it?

You might want to create a list of these before you start writing and then reference it as you write your review.

5. What is the downside to this product?

Nothing is perfect. And a review that sounds to good to be true, doesn’t sell crap. You’ll be gaining trust and credibility if you tell the readers about some minor imperfections or what it can’t do.

6. How are you going to wrap up the review?

Here you will state the main promises and how the product will help you reach them (or has helped you reach them). This is where you also make your recommendation and include a link to the sales page.

Should you create a review for your own product? I wouldn’t. Besides being unethical (like homemade testimonials), it has a good chance of sounding stilted or contrived. It would be far better to get some friends (or a professional copywriter) to try out your product. Hand them the above questions and let them come up with something that is honest and interesting (and you could always tweak it a bit to make it flow better).

How you use the review depends on your situation. It could be placed on a blog. It can have its own web page. It can be placed on a website that is specifically designed for product reviews.

BONUS TIP: You can get some practice with writing reviews AND make some money at the same time. How? By creating reviews for products that you have liked and becoming an affiliate for that product.

If you don’t have any reviews of your products, you will face an uphill battle of trying to make decent money. On the other hand, get a good review up and online and you’ll have a steady stream of customers for years to come!

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